Singapore - A City to Shout About

  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
  • Singapore - A City to Shout About
Issue 42, January 2012.

 A cultural melting pot and dazzling example of the region's economic successes, wealthy Singapore assails the senses of the first time visitor.
The former British trading post and colony has carved a unique niche for itself in its two short centuries of existence, nowadays offering a vivid combination of ultra-modern skyscrapers, remnants of tropical rainforest and colourful ethnic urban areas, each with a character very much of their own.
One of the most noticeable features of this tiny but bustling city-state is its cleanliness - indeed, it is sometimes criticised for its many seemingly petty regulations, such as the banning of chewing gum - but crime is virtually unknown, and it is one of the world's safest places to visit.
The cultural diversity of the country, religious and ethnic tolerance, photographic landscape, and cleanliness are compelling reasons why tourists keep coming over and over again to this city.
Singapore is a veritable feast for the senses, a heady mixture of the familiar and the exotic. It suits all budgets, too, presenting a happy contrast of opposites - grand and expensive at the famed Raffles Hotel, and low-key and cheap (yet tasty and good quality) in the food markets of Bugis Junction and Clarke Quay.
Singapore is a gourmet's paradise, ranging from humble street stalls to 5-star restaurants. There are over 30 different cooking styles, including various regional styles of Chinese cuisine, American, English, French, Indian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Russian and Swiss. Malay cuisine is a favourite, famed for its use of spices and coconut milk.
Singapore City is an acclaimed tourist hub bustling with activities and jam packed with plenty to do during your stay. The visitor is almost spoilt for choice for things to see and do, and in terms of vibrant nightlife, its rich cultural mix, and a whole planet's worth of culinary experiences.
Things to see and do in Singapore:
Raffles Hotel Without doubt, one of the most famous landmarks and most popular attractions in Singapore is the world famous "Raffles Hotel". The hotel, which dates from 1887, is "colonial" in style, and was named after the founder of Singapore, Sir Stamford Raffles, and is now managed by Raffles International. It is world famous for its luxurious accommodation and superb restaurants. The hotel also houses a tropical garden courtyard, museum and Victorian-style theatre.

The Singapore Zoo (Formerly Singapore Zoological Gardens) is acclaimed as one of the world's most spectacular zoos. The use of natural barriers like streams, rock walls and vegetation to separate animals from visitors enhances the "open" zoo concept. Spreading over 28 hectares, it is home to over 3,600 mammals, birds and reptiles, including rare and endangered species. The Zoo's orang-utan breeding programme has created a large community of these gentle, endangered species.

Sentosa Island Sentosa, which means peace and tranquility, was transformed into a resort in 1968. One of the main attractions in Singapore, it has since become a destination of enjoyment and recreation for everyone. There are many exciting attractions on this island, and it is easily accessible by cable car, bus, and by its very own Sentosa Express.

Chinatown To gain a better understanding of Singaporean culture, take a trip to Chinatown where you can find traditional Chinese customs carried out by Chinese communities from the southern provinces of Guangdong and Fujian dating from the early 19th century. Chinatown, Little India & Kampong Glam are the three distinctly different areas that make up the Singapore Ethnic Quarters.

Singapore River The Singapore River is a small river flowing through the central area of Singapore. It has great historical importance as the mouth of the river was formerly the old Port of Singapore. It flows through Boat Quay and Clarke Quay two of the main entertainment scenes of Singapore. Head down there and enjoy a night of great food and entertainment.

Shopping in Singapore is a favourite national pastime. Many visitors also visit Singapore for shopping rather than relaxation. For shoppers, this place is also known as Shopper’s Paradise. Located at Harbourfront, formerly Singapore’s World Trade Centre, VivoCity is currently Singapore’s largest shopping mall. It has more than 300 shops and even has an open air playground and water park for your young ones.

HOW TO GET THERE
Singapore Changi Airport or simply Changi Airport, is the main airport in Singapore. A major aviation hub in Southeast Asia, it serves more than 100 airlines operating 6,100 weekly flights flying off to some 210 cities in about 60 countries and territories worldwide. You can get directly from Lviv to Istanbul (flights three times per week), which in its turn offers several flights per week to and from Changi Airport.

Turkish Airlines’ representative office in Lviv is located at 4 Mickiewicza Sqr. and is open every weekday (closed Saturday and Sunday).
For further details please call + 38032-2970849.